New research from a study published by the World Health Organisation, shows that 1 in 25 people around the world have an STI. That is 4% of the population. The study looks only at data for Chlamydia, Gonorrhoea, Trichomonas and Syphilis. So the actual figure is likely to be higher.

Of great concern is the rise of the “superbug” STIs. These are STIs which are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics. There are incidents of Gonorrhoea and Mycoplasma being difficult to treat in the UK. These are certain strains of the bacteria. So not all Gonorrhoea is resistant. However some infections are not responding to known antibiotics.

These STIs are preventable and treatable. However, the global threat of antibiotic resistance looms large, highlighted by the almost unthinkable: a world without a cure for gonorrhoea in the not too distant future.

Matthea Chico, Report Author
World STI hotspots

World Trends

700 people are diagnosed with an STI every minute across the world. African remains the continent with the highest percentage of people with an STI. This study does not include HIV which is prevalent in Africa.

European Trends

Europe’s most common STI for both men and women was Chlamydia. 3.2% of women and 2.2% of men estimated to catch the infection each year. They are ten times more likely to have Chlamydia than Gonorrhoea. This STI is only caught by around 0.3% of the population.

UK Trends

Data from Public Health England shows that nearly 448,000 new STIs were diagnosed in England in 2018. Which is 5% higher than 2017.

It has never been more important to get tested for STIs. If you are sexually active, then you are at risk. The only way to know for sure is to get tested.

Anthea Morris, Better2Know

If you are worried about your sexual health please call us on the number above 24/7.




Contact Better2Know
0207 099 0955

Lines are open 24/7. Click to call.

Or click to Book Online now